Drawing: Ian Bartholomew as Chitterlow in Half A Sixpence

The Noel Coward Theatre is Ian Bartholomew’s second home. Three shows in three years at the West End venue and two Olivier nominations. The front of house staff even gave him a plaque to mark the occasion. In 2014/15 he appeared in the stage version of SHAKESPEARE IN LOVE as Sir Edmund Tylney, the man responsible for drama censorship in Elizabethan England.

Then he played the feisty impresario Vivian Van Damm in MRS HENDERSON PRESENTS last year and he is currently playing the eccentric playwright Critterlow in HALF A SIXPENCE, both roles he ‘got the nod’ for an Olivier nom. He signed my Critterlow sketch between shows on Saturday.

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Drawing: Emma Williams in Half A Sixpence

Emma Williams is hoping it will be fourth time lucky at this year’s Olivier Awards. The popular British musical theatre actress earned nomination number four for her current role as Helen Walsingham in the Chichester Festival Theatre’s production of HALF A SIXPENCE, which transferred to London’s Noel Coward Theatre last month. She recently won the WhatsOnStage Award, so here’s hoping!

Emma is also an accomplished songwriter, musician and writer, and is working on her first novel. After her professional stage debut in 2002 at the age of 18 as Truly Scrumptious in the original cast of CHITTY CHITTY BANG BANG at the London Palladium, Emma has originated a further five roles in the West End.

Her first Olivier nom was for Luisa in ZORRO at the Garrick in 2008, followed by Jenny in LOVE STORY at the Duchess and as Maureen last year in MRS HENDERSON PRESENTS at the Noel Coward,  where I managed to catch her last Saturday after the SIXPENCE matinee and she signed this portrait sketch for me. She remembered my MRS HENDERSON drawing which she also graphed. I wished her luck for the big night, which is on 9 April.

Drawing: Charlie Stemp in Half A Sixpence

charlie-stemp

The West End sensation at the moment is the effervescent 23 year-old Londoner Charlie Stemp and his performance as Arthur Kipps in Julian Fellowes’ revised version of HALF A SIXPENCE, which transferred from the sell-out season at the Chichester Festival Theatre to the Noel Coward Theatre last November. It’s a role originally created as a star vehicle for Tommy Steele and the 1963 West End Premiere. Despite Charlie’s dizzying rise to the top of the theatre world, he is kept grounded by his family. His Dad sent him a review with his name misspelt, “this Charlie Stump is doing well.”

But he new how to sign his name on my sketch for me last Saturday when I caught up with him arriving for the matinee.