Drawing: Anna Goryachova in Carmen

Autographed drawing of opera singer Anna Goryachova in Carmen

Russian mezzo-soprano Anna Goryachova made her Royal Opera debut earlier this year in the title role of Barrie Kosky’s ‘daringly dark’ new production of CARMEN. She shared the role with fellow debutant Gaelle Arquez. The 34 year-old native of St Petersburg began her opera career in her hometown’s Chamber Opera and has been a popular performer throughout Europe and Scandinavia since.

She had previously performed the role of CARMEN at Belgium’s Opera Vlaanderen and Teato Real in Madrid. In London the production broke with convention, resembling more the dazzle-dazzle of Vaudeville. Anna signed my drawing, which I left for her at the Royal Opera House stage door, with a vivid red crayon and returned it to me along with a very nice thank you note.

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Drawing: Gaelle Arquez in Carmen

Autographed drawing of opera singer Gaelle ArquezOne of the world’s rising young opera stars, French mezzo-soprano Gaelle Arquez made her Convent Garden debut earlier this year, performing the title role in the Royal Opera’s production of Bizet’s CARMEN. It’s a role she knows well however, having played the famous gypsy previously this year in Frankfurt and Madrid. After graduating from the Conservatoire National Superieur de Musique de Paris, Gaelle debuted as Zerlina in DON GIOVANNI for the Opera de Paris and has since played all the major opera houses around the world. Gaelle signed my drawing at the Royal Opera House after a performance of CARMEN last month.

Drawing: Malin Bystrom in Salome

Autographed drawing of Malin Bystrom in Salome at the Royal Opera House in London

“In Swedish soprano Malin Bystrom, we come as near to perfection as we ever will: a petulant, imperious teenager becoming drugged with lust,” wrote Michael Church in his five-star Independent review for the third revival of David McVicar’s gory and provocative production of Richard Strauss’s SALOME at the Royal Opera House. “Her voice rides easily over the hundred-piece orchestra and the porcelain purity of her tone contrasts ever more starkly with her blood-bolstered presence. Wonderful.”

After six appearances since her Covent Garden debut in 2002, Malin returned for the ROH’s 2017/1018 Autumn season, playing Helene in LES VEPRES SICILIENNES in November and the biblical femme fatale SALOME in January.

Malin signed my sketch for me after I left it at the stage door.

Drawing: Adrianne Pieczonka in Tosca

Autographed drawing of soprano Adrianne Pieczonka in Tosca at the Royal Opera House, London

Canadian soprano star Adrianne Pieczonka returned to London’s Covent Garden last month to play the title role in the Royal Opera’s production of Puccini’s TOSCA. This is Adrienne’s fourth appearance for the company, having debuted as Donna Anna in
Mozart’s DON GIOVANNI in 2002. She also played Floria Tosca in the 2009 film version directed by Frank Zamacona based on the San Francisco Opera production.

Adrienne was in the first of three casts for this season’s Royal Opera staging, conducted by Dan Ettinger and Placido Domingo. Describing her own vocal range as “somewhere between a lyric and a dramatic soprano,” Adrienne is able to include a wide variety of roles in her repertoire and has become internationally celebrated for her interpretations of Wagner, Strauss, Verdi and Puccini.

The German magazine ‘Der Spiegel’ wrote,” Frenetic ovations greeted Adrienne Pieczonka for her supreme performance… clear, powerful with contoured high notes and precise dramatic gestures… the star of the evening.”

I left this sketch of her at the stage door and she not only signed and returned it, but included a nice note: ‘Dear Mark – I am so impressed with your drawing! Fantastic!’… so I guess she liked it.

Drawing: Yuja Wang

The ever popular Chinese classical pianist Yuja Wang returned to London just before Christmas to a packed, returns-only Wigmore Hall recital with violinist leoniadas Kavakos.

Starting at the age of six, Yuja rose to prominence and became an internationally recognised concert pianist by the age of 20. “For me, playing music is about transporting to another way of life, another way of being,” she said in an LA Times interview.

In 2017 she was named Musical America’s Artist of the Year. Apart from her musical skills and technique she is known for her ‘especially correct posture, elegant, nearly exemplary’ and her eye-catching attire and glamorous stage presence.

Yuja signed this drawing I left at Wigmore Hall, returning it this week.

Drawing: Alisa Weilerstein

Autographed drawing of classical cellist Alisa Weilerstein

The American classical cellist Alisa Weilerstein is one of the most popular performers on both sides of the Atlantic, appearing with all the foremost orchestras in the US and Europe. Among her many accolades is the 2011 MacArthur Fellowship or ‘genius grant’ which is awarded to American citizens or residents who show ‘extraordinary originality and dedication in their creative pursuits.’

While described as ‘classical,’ Alisa has expanded her cello repertoire and is an ardent champion of new music. She is renowned for her performance energy, ‘natural virtuosity, intensity, spontaneity and sensitivity of interpretation’.

Alisa signed my drawing after her recital with pianist Inon Barnatan at London’s Wigmore Hall last November.

Drawing: Gabriela Montero

Autographed drawing of pianist Gabriela Montero

Venezuelan pianist Gabriela Montero returned to London over the festive season with a lunchtime recital at Wigmore Hall.

“Whether she’s hurling ferocious social-media rebukes at the government of her native Venezuela or contouring fiery interpretations on the ivories, Gabriela Montero is never dull. You don’t come out of her recitals thinking, as you do with many modern pianists, ‘Amazing technique. Where’s the charisma?’ She had second helpings when the plates of personality were handed out,” wrote the Time critic Richard Morrison in his review intro.

Apart from her classical repertoire, Gabriela is also known for her real-time improvisation of complex musical pieces based on themes suggested by her audience. She signed this sketch for me before her recital at Wigmore Hall.

Drawing: Sir Simon Rattle

Autographed drawing of conductor Sir Simon Rattle

Britain’s superstar conductor Sir Simon Rattle returned to his homeland in September, after fifteen years leading the Berliner Philharmoniker to take up the Musical Directorship of the London Symphony Orchestra and Artist-In-Residence at the Barbican and the Guildhall School of Music and Drama. To mark his inaugural season the LSO presented a 10-day celebratory Festival THIS IS RATTLE. Guardian critic Andrew Clements said it was an ‘auspicious start to LSO’s new era of Simon Rattle,’ awarding the opening concert five-stars. I dropped off this sketch at the Orchestra’s HQ on the 6th floor in the Barbican last month and he kindly signed and returned it for me.

Drawing: Sheena Easton

Scottish songstress Sheena Easton made her West End debut this year as Dorothy Brock in the revival of the hit musical 42nd STREET at the Theatre Royal in Drury Lane. The two-time Grammy Award winner has sold over 20 million records worldwide with Gold and Platinum albums in the US, Europe and Asia. She is the first and only artist to have top 5 hits in five different Billboard charts consecutively. Sheena has appeared on Broadway in MAN OF LA MANCHA and as Rizzo in GREASE. I left this sketch at the stage door and it came back signed and dedicated.

Drawing: Ian Anderson, Jethro Tull

The rock god Ian Anderson, frontman and flautist for the legendary band JETHRO TULL is one of my all-time musical heroes. Ever since I was introduced to their music as a high school student visiting my Aunty Tricia and John, her boyfriend (and subsequently her husband and my uncle) at their university flat. Tull was always playing and became a influential or should that be in-flute-tial part of my formative and not-so-education, listening to albums such as THICK AS A BRICK, AQUALUNG and A PASSION PLAY.

Ian’s signatures are the one legged stance and the iconic flute, which he actually took up started playing because of his frustration with the guitar and he wanted something a bit more idiosyncratic for the band formed in 1967 and named after the British 18th century agriculturist.

I have been lucky enough to see Ian and Tull perform a few times and in fact meet Ian before a concert in Melbourne, Australia, albeit it briefly many moons ago. It only occurred to me a couple of weeks ago that I hadn’t drawn him, so that go sorted lickity split and I posted the drawing to his company. It came back even lickity splitter, signed, before he embarked on the latest North American tour. It’s one of my most treasured pieces.