Drawing: Jean-Paul Gaultier

Autographed drawing of fashion designer Jean-Paul Gaultier

Although Jean-Paul Gaultier and myself are at the complete opposite ends of the fashion spectrum we did find some common ground – albeit briefly – outside the Artist Entrance to London’s Queen Elizabeth hall last week. The French fashion icon’s ‘eccentric, eclectic and erotic’ FASHION FREAK SHOW made its UK debut at the Southbank venue for a short thirteen performance residency.

Originating at the Folies Bergere in Paris, it is Jean-Paul’s staged autobiography, celebrating 50 years of pop culture through the eyes of this charismatic and influential Frenchman, known for his characteristic irreverent avant-grade style dating back to the early 1980’s, when he was labelled fashion’s ‘enfant terrible.’ Jean-Paul challenged the standard views of fashion to cement his place in its history, establishing a haute couture and pret-a-porter empire, including high fashion luxury goods and perfumes.

Some of his signature creations are the ‘Man-skirt’ and the infamous conical bra worn by Madonna in the 1990’s. Jean-Paul grew up in a Paris suburb, where he was introduced to the fashion world by his maternal grandmother, Marie Garage. Without any formal training in fashion design, he would, from an early age send sketches to stylists he admired. Pierre Cardin was one of the first major designers to recognise his talent and hired him as an assistant in 1970.

He recently told Vogue “even if it doesn’t look like it, I’m quite shy. I like privacy. It seems strange shy people do the most exaggerated things.”

In her Guardian review of the FASHION FREAK SHOW, Lyndsey Winship wrote, “A fabulous fiesta of fabric and flesh… as much a celebration of bodies and sensuality and sexual freedom… a famously fun romp through the French designers life and career,”

Jean-Paul signed my sketch, as he arrived on the opening night at the Queen Elizabeth Hall.

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Drawing: Jerry Seinfeld

Comic genius and car collector Jerry Seinfeld returned to London last week to perform four shows over two nights at the Hammersmith Apollo. He is listed as the 12th Greatest Stand-up Comedian of All Time by Comedy Central with his ‘observational comedy’. A couple of examples to remind us of his brilliance, “It’s amazing that the amount of news that happens in the world every day always just exactly fits the newspaper” or “Make no mistake about why these babies are here-they are here to replace us.”
In collaboration with Larry David, he created and wrote the self-titled sitcom SEINFELD, in which he plays a fictional version of himself, a mild germaphobe and neat freak, minor celeb, stand-up comedian with his best friend George (Jason Alexander), friend and former girlfriend Elaine (Julia Louis-Dreyfus) and the neighbour across the hall, Cosmo Kramer (Michael Richards), set in a Manhattan apartment building on New York’s Upper West Side.

SEINFELD ran for nine seasons from July 5, 1989 – May 14, 1998, collecting 41 major awards, including 10 Primetime Emmys and three Golden Globes. It is regarded as one of the greatest and most influential sitcoms ever, and ranked the best TV show by Entertainment Weekly, Rolling Stone and TV Guide among others. The dialogue incorporated ‘Seinfeldian’ code words and recurring phrases, often referred to as ‘Seinlanguage’ that have become cemented in popular culture such as ‘Hello, Newman!’, ‘Not that there’s anything wrong with that’, ‘It’s not a lie if you believe it’….’Yada, yada, yada.’

Jerry also has an impressive collection of 150 cars, including 43 Porches, housed in a three-story, $1.4m Manhattan garage with it’s own dedicated fleet management team. Some of the vehicles appear in his talk show, COMEDIANS IN CARS GETTING COFFEE.
Jerry very kindly dedicated and signed my sketch for me at the Apollo.

Drawing: Henry Blofeld

Autographed drawing of cricket commentator Henry Blofeld

I had the pleasure of catching up with the one and only Henry Blofeld during this years Cricket Word Cup, which was hosted in England and Wales over the past seven weeks. ‘Blowers’ – one of the true legends of cricket commentary – took to the stage in for a Cricket World Cup Special: An evening with Henry Blofeld in conversation at the Emmanuel Centre in London’s Westminister, where he kindly signed and dedicated my sketch with his signature saying, ‘My dear old thing.’

Before Henry entered the commentary realm, he was “an opening batsman of sorts” with sixteen first-class matches for Cambridge University, scoring his only fist-class century against the MCC at Lords in July 1959 in his penultimate game. Realising he had no taste for merchant banking after leaving university, he ‘drifted into sports journalism.’ While covering England’s tour of India in 1963/64 for the Guardian he was close to being picked as an emergency batsman when Micky Stewart fell ill before the second test in Bombay. He also did TV commentary for ITV and later, in the 1990’s for BSkyB.

In 1972 Blowers joined the BBC Radio’s TEST MATCH SPECIAL team. His commentary is characterised by a ‘plummy voice’ and his idiosyncratic mention of superfluous details regarding the scene, including construction cranes, pink shirts in the crowd, pigeons, buses, and other flying objects. He was also a regular member of the commentary team on New Zealand television while England toured there and I recall once sending a cartoon of him as a seagull, captioned ‘Henry Livingston Seagull’, which he displayed during the live broadcast. After 45 years with TMS, Blowers retired at the age of seventy-seven, after commentating the test between England and the West Indies at Lords in September 2017, receiving a standing ovation on a lap of the ground following the match.

He wrote on his website, “Listeners will now be pleased to know that their chances of being told the right name of the fielders at third man and fine leg have greatly increased. I hope some will be sad that they will now hear less about the lifestyles of pigeons, seagulls and helicopters, although I fear the general feeling will be one of huge relief.”

The final of the World Cup was played at Lords last Sunday between the hosts England and my beloved Black Caps from New Zealand. The thriller ended in a tie, as did the subsequent ‘Super Over’. England were crowned World Champions on a count back of boundaries scored – congrats to them. Writing in his column for the Daily Mail, Henry wrote it was the “greatest cricket match of all time. What drama, what tension, what heroics. My dear old things, in all my years of watching cricket I cannot recall any match that kept me on my toes”.

Obviously as a New Zealander I was disappointed with the result, but immensely proud of our team, for the way they not only played and contributed to such a magnificent sporting spectacle, but also for the way they responded to the manner of their defeat. I was very pleased he wrote, “I felt for New Zealand, truly. Their undaunted spirit, their sense of decency even after they lost by that wafer-thin margin was an absolute tonic and very much in the spirit of the game.”